The Right Companion: Australian Shepherd

The Right Companion: Australian Shepherd


I just found this pet related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

https://youtube.com/watch?v=z6_Cp9vM9hM%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

YouTube Description

www.janson.com Finally, all of our favorite dogs – on one DVD! This indispensable “visual guidebook” is not just for prospective dog owners, but for dog lovers in general.

What do you think?

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26 Responses

  1. Gregman420
    | Reply

    This guys a douchebag ! I own an aussie. I’ve tracked their genes more into Germany than to Spain. And Aussies (depending on the individual)will differ in their need for extensive outdoor work. He is generalizing the breed’s more instinctual aspects, and honestly isn’t really that knowledgable of the breed today (21st century). Aussies are being overbred, but one thing doesn’t change, their a family oriented, intelligent breed. Sorry for my spelling, my blue merle and I have had a couple ales.

  2. KolaKittie
    | Reply

    We got a black tri miniature Aussie. I swear he is just the cutest thing ever!! VEEEERY energetic but he will be a lap dog sometimes. They are by far the most adorable dogs eveeer.

  3. karaLUVEanime
    | Reply

    I agree im 16 years old now i have had my Aussie since she was 13 weeks old boy was she a handful she is 2 years old now and is still very much a puppy,she always follows her nose and doesn’t listen when i call her to come back i do not have a fenced in yard she is older so things have gotten better but it was very frustrating,and still is.I live on 10 acers this dog is NEVER tired she’s always ready to play.They are to smart for their own good,”ohh” the thing she ate when she was a puppy

  4. blckcat28
    | Reply

    @HowToGetFreebies Working dogs in general are healthier than dogs who are only bred for looks or for the show ring, simply because they are bred to do things physical, so an unhealthy dog will not succeed and will likely not be put back in the gene pool (allowed to breed) whereas the show/companion dogs are bred mostly for looks, so a fault in their health may be overlooked because they are particularly beautiful, meaning hereditary diseases are often passed on.

  5. 592220
    | Reply

    @chetzmom How are they with cats? My daughter is hounding me for an Aussie and I do not want to be unfair to either the cats or the dog. The cats are about 2 yrs old and I would prefer an Aussie puppie to train him to live with the cats

    • Mona
      | Reply

      I rescued a 5 month old aussie/border cross last year. Loves cats. Buts everybody is right. He is very HIGH ENERGY!!!! Don’t let your daughter talk you into it unless you can handle it. I’am a doggroomer. Have been for 30 years. Always told my clients to do their research before they got a dog. As much as I was prepare for this dog, I was blown away with his energy. Be ready to go for good training, be consistently throughout the house, they are sooooo, smart. Don’t baby them. Use their intelligence. That is how you will get a great dog by the time they are around 2. One good book to read to help with doggie manners, so you can get away with kinda of babying them, is “The Loved Dog Method of Training” by Tamar Gellar. Easy read.

  6. kahsse
    | Reply

    @592220 I had one from a pup (for 12 years- still miss him). We had 2 cats when we got him. Exposing them young is really the key.
    He was fine with the cats. These dogs are really people focused & care more about the humans in the house than anything else. He only paid attention to the cats when they were running around & then his herding instinct kicked in. He would chase them, if he saw them running but never, ever tried to hurt them.

  7. 592220
    | Reply

    @kahsse Thank you for replying. I think that may be the key with animals is to train them when they are young. My main concern are the cats as they are comfortable, they are content and I don’t want them afraid to live in their own house. We have an acre of land and a pool so perhaps it’s time to take the plunge!

  8. Magnusguld
    | Reply

    my shepherd is afraid of sheeps and other creatures except dogs and cats..

    O.o

  9. enjoi679
    | Reply

    i wouldnt suggest gettin a bobbed tail aussie its just kinda creul and it like sort of supporting more aussies to have a bobbed tail especially if you own a aussie for companionship purposes and having a family dog there really should be no reason to get a bobbed aussie its sad

  10. 156Randi
    | Reply

    I love my Aussie and enjo679, some Aussies are born with bobbed tails. so it is not always cruel and at that young of age they dont remember because they have to be bobbed withing 48 hours or 72 something like that or vets wont do it.

    But I love my aussie she is my best friend and I love her very much she is very smart knows obedience and agility and loves to run with our Australian Cattle Dog (Blue heeler) and play with the sheep and horse.

  11. 156Randi
    | Reply

    I love my Aussie and enjo679, some Aussies are born with bobbed tails. so it is not always cruel and at that young of age they dont remember because they have to be bobbed withing 48 hours or 72 something like that or vets wont do it.
    But I love my aussie she is my best friend and I love her very much she is very smart knows obedience and agility and loves to run with our Australian Cattle Dog and play with the sheep and horse. She loves cats as she has been around them since 6wks

  12. Stellamust
    | Reply

    @waterkeeper03 I must disagree with your statement that there is no mini aussie and that they have shelty in the gene pool. Originally Aussies were smaller dogs and were bred larger to cope with herding cattle. A mini is just a smaller Aussie, between 14-18 inches at the shoulder. There a lot of well recognized breeders in the States breeding these dogs.

  13. Stellamust
    | Reply

    @HvensFury You could look at the English Shepherd breed. Some people cross them with Aussies. Each dog should be assessed on their individual abilities from a young age with a responsible breeder as to their herding instincts.

  14. Stellamust
    | Reply

    @LiaChien I agree with you. In the UK docking tails or ears is no longer allowed.

  15. Stellamust
    | Reply

    @latinamajor Some of them are, however the majority have their tails docked at a young age in the US. It is not allowed in the UK now and in other parts of Europe.

  16. waterkeeper03
    | Reply

    @Stellamust I’m not saying there def is Shetland in the gene.
    there are also a lot of well recognized breeders spitting out “Teacup” chihuahuas and “toy” yorkies… doesn’t make them real or legit. absolutely NO ONE from UKC to AKC to ASCA accepts the classification of “MINI” Australian Shepherd. the idea of a MINI working or herding dog is ridiculous and nobody with a knowledge of dog terminology would accept it.

    it’s either an Aussie or not, no matter if it fits the standard, or not.

  17. aussieshepherdlovers
    | Reply

    Cannot help but smile everytime an aussie is working. Love those dogs. I had two until recently, we lost a 10yr old girl just recently. RIP Abby.

  18. aussieshepherdlovers
    | Reply

    Cannot help but smile everytime an aussie is working. Love those dogs. I had two until recently, we lost a 10yr old girl. RIP my Abby.

  19. Brianndlo4
    | Reply

    Stella, you’re right, but talking to an ASCA boofball snob is like talking to a wall. The original Aussie in North America was 25-28 lbs, agile, and smart. Now, thanks to the miracle of “breed club standards” we have Aussies running 45-60 lbs that (comparatively speaking) can’t get out of their own way. Just inconvenient to breeders of show lines charging $900/pet -quality pup that its AS possible to breed small Aussies to small Aussies to get small Aussies, and some ppl like them that way.

  20. Brianndlo4
    | Reply

    My Pancho is my 3rd Aussie, and this video is pretty much in line w/my experience. rule of thumb: A bored Aussie is a bad Aussie. Leave one alone, and they’ll take the initiative and find a project to take on. Mine unstuffs my couch cushions for me. Great dogs given a lot of activity, lot of mental engagement and lot of attention. Since they’re always doing something, it’s relatively easy to reinforce desirable behavior and correct bad behavior. If you don’t put the time in, it wont work for you

  21. flamecrysta
    | Reply

    @Stellamust actually, most australian are born without tails. They were bred to not have tails, since having something long, flowing, and easy stepped on isn’t exactly the best design for herding dogs

  22. XKEITHNJX
    | Reply

    @12MacBaby i hope he’s not inbred :/

  23. HunterWarrior
    | Reply

    My parents have several acres of very secluded Oregon forest (borders with national forest) and they have an Australian Shepherd. I visit occasionally and it always remembers me and accompanies me on any walk through the forest I take. It has SUCH a strong bond with the family. SO high energy too. Watching him get to a full sprint and super man jump off of a log and launching like 15 feet through the air is a sight to see. He’s like wonder dog! … He also chases birds.

  24. jmerrow1
    | Reply

    I have 3 Aussies there a lot of fun:)

  25. kelliraes
    | Reply

    I’ve got three Aussies, had four, but my beloved “Dumpling Dough” passed away at the age of 12 to cancer. He was the love of my life and my shadow dog. He wanted to be under my skin. Any Aussie owner will know exactly what I’m talking about : )

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